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Jaume Martorell Cruz

 Jaume Martorell Cruz

Email: j.martorellcruz@qmul.ac.uk

email: j.martorellcruz@qmul.ac.uk 
Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 2691
Location: Mile End, Bancroft Building, Room 4.23

1st Supervisor: Professor Brigitte Granville
2nd Supervisor: Dr Martha Prevezer

Project Title: 

"Institutional Participation and Economic Growth in Eurozone Coordinated Market Economies"

Project Description: 

My research is focused on how Institutional Participation can help to explain the different economic imbalances between eurozone countries. 

The institutional influence on economic growth is seen as one of the main factors in the divergence between developed and developing economies. Beyond this, the development of different institutional complementariness has been used to explain the development of different competitive advantages. This approach differentiates two main varieties of capitalism: Liberal Market Economies (LMEs) and Coordinated Market Economies (CMEs).

The main difference between these two types of capitalist economies is that CMEs tend to have higher levels of strategic coordination between firms and economic and political organisations, while LMEs rely more on competitive market coordination. Within CMEs we find a broad range of heterogeneous countries, such as Japan, Netherlands or Mexico, relying on strategic coordination, albeit using different processes and obtaining different outcomes. These differences can also be found among eurozone CMEs, similar in processes but not in outcomes.

This study will try to explain these differences taking into account the different levels of institutional participation.

Broadly speaking an impersonal participation in economic and political institutions is a cornerstone in the transition towards institutional settlements that foster economic growth. However there is less literature on how different levels of institutional participation influence developed economies, which is the main task of my research: defining a measure of institutional participation and testing his influence on the eurozone coordinated market economies. 

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