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BUSM069 Organisational Behaviour

Semester

1 (2017/18)

Level

7

Module organiser

Professor Rob Briner

Module overview

This module will provide an in-depth understanding of the broad range of theory, research, and practice in organizational behaviour for the adoption of appropriate policies and leadership styles. This will include understanding individual differences, motivational factors, ethics, group dynamics, patterns and negotiation practices which can mediate the functioning of an organisation. The module will analyse a range of case studies to illuminate the different work patterns, practices and behaviour both at individual, group and organisational levels. Students will gain an awareness and knowledge of contemporary issues and approaches to organisational change and development facing organizations. Beyond providing theoretical frameworks, the module will augment skills to prepare students for the work place through communication and team management skills, and through analytical and critical thinking skills .

Assessment

40% coursework and 60% examination 

Indicative reading list

  • Mullins, L. J. (2007) Management and Organisational Behaviour. Eighth Edition, Prentice Hall, London.
  • Arnold, J., Robertson, I. and Cooper, C. L. (2005) Work Psychology: Understanding Human Behaviour in the Workplace. Fourth Edition, Pitman Publishing, London.
  • Griffin, R. W. and Moorhead, G. (2007) Organizational Behaviour: Managing People and Organizations. Eighth Edition, Houghton Mifflin.
  • Robbins, S. P. (2008) Essentials of Organizational Behaviour. Ninth Edition, Prentice Hall.
  • Buchanan, D. and Badham, R. (2008) Power, Politics, and Organizational Change. Second Edition, Sage

Relevant journals include:

• Harvard Business Review
• Journal of General Management
• Journal of Management Studies
• Journal of Managerial Psychology
• Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology
• Journal of Organizational Behaviour
• The Leadership and Organisational Development Journal
• The British Journal of Management

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